William F. Hayden Park Trail Improvements

The City of Lakewood is making improvements to two sections of trail at William F. Hayden Park this fall to improve sustainability and the user experience.


Forsberg Park to Green Mountain Trail Improvements

The first segment targeted for improvements is the dirt trail connecting Forsberg Park to Green Mountain Trail through the Alameda Avenue underpass. The trail is exceptionally rutted and erosion continuously floods debris onto the concrete underpass walkway. These issues create hazards to park users and are a continual maintenance issue for park staff. Staff will be adding a significant drainage dip near the underpass to redirect water flow off of the trail, will reroute the connection to the Green Mountain Trail to minimize erosion, reduce the trail grade and create a more sustainable trail surface.

Green Mountain Trail Improvements

City staff is partnering with Volunteers for Outdoors Colorado (VOC) on the second trail segment, a reroute of an eroded section of the Green Mountain Trail above the Utah Trailhead. The reroute will be a few hundred feet long and include several turns and built-in drainage structures to follow standard best practice designs to reduce erosion and improve trail surface sustainability. The turns will be “in-sloped” turns that are designed to shed water just before and after the turn. In addition, waterbars along Hayden Trail will be rebuilt. Traditionally made with dirt, waterbars are used to prevent erosion on bike paths and walking trails.

All new trail design features have been included to create a welcoming trail experience for all visitors. Click on the map to the right for additional details.

The City of Lakewood is making improvements to two sections of trail at William F. Hayden Park this fall to improve sustainability and the user experience.


Forsberg Park to Green Mountain Trail Improvements

The first segment targeted for improvements is the dirt trail connecting Forsberg Park to Green Mountain Trail through the Alameda Avenue underpass. The trail is exceptionally rutted and erosion continuously floods debris onto the concrete underpass walkway. These issues create hazards to park users and are a continual maintenance issue for park staff. Staff will be adding a significant drainage dip near the underpass to redirect water flow off of the trail, will reroute the connection to the Green Mountain Trail to minimize erosion, reduce the trail grade and create a more sustainable trail surface.

Green Mountain Trail Improvements

City staff is partnering with Volunteers for Outdoors Colorado (VOC) on the second trail segment, a reroute of an eroded section of the Green Mountain Trail above the Utah Trailhead. The reroute will be a few hundred feet long and include several turns and built-in drainage structures to follow standard best practice designs to reduce erosion and improve trail surface sustainability. The turns will be “in-sloped” turns that are designed to shed water just before and after the turn. In addition, waterbars along Hayden Trail will be rebuilt. Traditionally made with dirt, waterbars are used to prevent erosion on bike paths and walking trails.

All new trail design features have been included to create a welcoming trail experience for all visitors. Click on the map to the right for additional details.

Ask a question about the trail improvements at William F. Hayden Park. We'll respond within two business days. Please note that your questions will be visible to the public.

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  • I have no idea how to leave a comment on the proposed trail improvements on Green Mountain, but I think the switchbacks are a poor idea and will not be used. People will continue to use the original trail, with the result that more of the land will be disturbed.

    celia asked 14 days ago

    We understand the concerns around trail users cutting corners, it is an ongoing issue across the Front Range. Unfortunately, the existing trail route is unsustainable due to its steep grade which has caused erosion and an expansion of the trail to over 10 feet wide. The new trail layout include corners in order to provide drainage, prevent erosion and reduce the overall grade. The new design will also slow down user speeds in an area where trail conflicts have occurred, and is specifically designed to stay within a narrow corridor to make it less appealing for people to shortcut. We will be fully closing and reclaiming the old tail surface to deter use. Thank you for taking the time to provide comments!


  • Have you considered how the snow and moisture makes these trails impassable.? Trail users frequently bypass the trail when it is wet and muddy and filled with snow and create "social" trails. Since the trail is on the north side of the mountain conditions are often like this after a rain or snow storm. The switchbacks make it more likely people with use the old trail or cut across the land to gain the upper path of the trail.

    jswesley303 asked 13 days ago

    Thank you for your feedback! We understand the snow and mud issue; however, it isn't feasible to only build trails in areas on south slopes. Unfortunately in this area the slopes and soils that face south are not suitable for a trail. We are hopeful that continued education will help trail users avoid trails altogether when they are susceptible to damage and are working on ways to expand this messaging. If you have ideas, please share!


  • Why did the trail access to Green Mountain that runs behind the concrete drainage area at the end of Ohio get closed? I enjoyed using that trail in years past.

    Jan asked 27 days ago

    Thank you for your question! Unfortunately, the social trail you are referring to was not an official trail and was an unauthorized use of Green Mountain at the time it was closed. According to our staff, the area was formally closed, fenced and signed for two reasons:

    1. It is a sensitive wildlife habitat and the trail use was degrading the corridor including the spring that runs in the valley.
    2. There was tremendous resource damage including vegetation trampling, litter, human waste and unauthorized tree removal due to camping. Staff spent several years removing these camps and cleaning up the area.

    Let us know if you have further questions and thank you for engaging with LakewoodTogether.