Mount Carbon Trail Project at Bear Creek Lake Park

Consultation has concluded.

Lakewood Parks Division is rerouting a segment of Mount Carbon Trail this summer to improve sustainability and the user experience. The section of trail planned for reroute is located on the north side of Bear Creek Lake Park on the west side of the Bear Creek Reservoir Dam. The current trail follows the Bear Creek Lake Park Dam Road from the Mountain View picnic area to the top of the dam. The existing trail surface follows a steep grade that is outside of best practice standards, resulting in multiple significant issues that will be addressed by the reroute including minimizing erosion, restoration of vegetation, limiting existing overuse of maintenance resources and mitigation of user conflicts.

What to Expect

City staff are rerouting the trail several hundred feet to the west to move it onto a hillside that allows the trail route to follow standard best practice designs to reduce erosion and improve trail surface sustainability. These best practices include being able to “out slope” the trail, that is designing the trail tread at less of a slope. Incorporating multiple “rolling dips” into the trail to provide permanent drainage. A technique called “lift and tilt” will be used on the flatter area of terrain near the top of the dam to create ripples in the trail surface that help improve drainage and drying. Several turns will also be designed into the trail surface to reduce grades, prevent erosion and reduce user speeds. These turns will be “in-sloped” turns that are designed to shed water just before and after the turn. All new trail design features have been included to create a welcoming trail experience for all visitors.

Consultation has concluded.

Lakewood Parks Division is rerouting a segment of Mount Carbon Trail this summer to improve sustainability and the user experience. The section of trail planned for reroute is located on the north side of Bear Creek Lake Park on the west side of the Bear Creek Reservoir Dam. The current trail follows the Bear Creek Lake Park Dam Road from the Mountain View picnic area to the top of the dam. The existing trail surface follows a steep grade that is outside of best practice standards, resulting in multiple significant issues that will be addressed by the reroute including minimizing erosion, restoration of vegetation, limiting existing overuse of maintenance resources and mitigation of user conflicts.

What to Expect

City staff are rerouting the trail several hundred feet to the west to move it onto a hillside that allows the trail route to follow standard best practice designs to reduce erosion and improve trail surface sustainability. These best practices include being able to “out slope” the trail, that is designing the trail tread at less of a slope. Incorporating multiple “rolling dips” into the trail to provide permanent drainage. A technique called “lift and tilt” will be used on the flatter area of terrain near the top of the dam to create ripples in the trail surface that help improve drainage and drying. Several turns will also be designed into the trail surface to reduce grades, prevent erosion and reduce user speeds. These turns will be “in-sloped” turns that are designed to shed water just before and after the turn. All new trail design features have been included to create a welcoming trail experience for all visitors.

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  • I very much so support more sustainable trails and really enjoy the new Rooney Valley Trail. Green Mountain is one of the most underrated mountain biking areas in the region. Thank you for continuing this trail work. I do wish the new Rooney Valley Trail was directional and bikes only, at least on certain days. The way it is designed, it is meant for going down fast and this isn't generally isn't possible to do in a safe manner with the amount of trail users on it now.

    wsbsyr asked 4 months ago

    We are glad you enjoy Lakewood trails! Thank you for your feedback regarding trail usage, we are embarking on these types of conversations and will soon launch a survey of trail users in the field to gain additional feedback on trail conflict and potential solutions.

  • I strongly support this reroute and the way it is proposed and hope the city will do more like this. Establishing trails that has smart and enjoyable design features that makes them more sustainable is a no-brainer. Regarding Rooney, as a rider that likes it steep and rocky, I will miss the old trail BUT I know that that trail was not sustainable and with the increase in users we are seeing in our urban parks, it had to be changed. I like what was done. It slows the bikers down but still offers an enjoyable and challenging experience. I can't speak for equestrians, runners or hikers but I'd think the Rooney reroute makes sense for them too. I can't imagine the old trail with all of the baby heads and ruts was a great experience. In any event, the old trail was blown out and something had to be done. This reroute, though maybe not perfect, was the best solution in my opinion.

    Mike asked 6 months ago

    Thanks you for taking the time to provide feedback on this project!

  • The Rooney rerout is a great piece of work in terms of taking a rutted plunge of a trail, which I personally never rode downhill, and injecting some serious fun. It appears to be designed as a flow trail with dips and berms which give a great rollercoaster effect on the down. On the up, they serve to ratchet you up the hill, almost like long smooth steps. I have read some hiker complaints, but TBH, there are still a multitude of other trail options on GM if you want to stumble over baby heads and ruts. Plus, I think a chunk of the funding for this - and effort? Came from Coomba, so it would seem logical that it has more Mtb focus. Couple things: 1. These types of trails require a bit more maintenance- is there any additional funding for maintenance- or organizational effort to get volunteer trail crew? 2. The lower section approaching the junction gets going fast on the DH -and has a blind corner- With the big rollers , you may lose braking/tire contact - use caution. 3. There are a couple berms which have rocks on the inside - unless these serve some erosion control purposes, they seem a bit hazardous. 3. On some of the berms, they are so tight that you lose momentum-but not ya any plans to build them bigger so they can be carved? Overall great addition- and much needed

    Gh asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for taking the time to comment! Our staff has responded to your questions below:

    1) This trail is actually designed to require less maintenance than older styles of trail as it is designed to shed water much better. This should help resolve rutting issues we see on other trails. We do not have any additional funding, but do have an ongoing trail volunteer program. We are always looking for more volunteers!

    2) The lower section maintained the old trail grade and layout and we added drainage features. We had not noticed the blind spot, but will take a look at it and see if minor adjustments can be made.

    3) The rocks on the inside of turns were placed to help armor those sections in areas where the trail crosses a natural drain.

    4) The turns are intentionally tighter as part of the design of this trail is actually to slow mountain bikes down a bit to help minimize trail conflicts. On two-way multiple use trails we do not plan to construct full berm turns for this reason. 

    Hope this helps!


  • Please do not do to this trail what was done on Green Mountain. As an avid MTB rider, it is now a joke. I will not ride it again. Very sad to turn a fun ride into an amusement park ride.

    Kevin Kilgore asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback, please know the intention is not to create a fun ride, rather address erosion and create a more sustainable trail!


  • Thank for improving the trails! I am always in favor of more safety, more sustainability, more fun and just more trails! Thanks for the hard work and effort to improving the overall experience for all visitors to our parks. The Green Mountain improvements are wonderful. Keep it up the great work and inviting the community to get involved.

    Gil McCormick asked 6 months ago

    Glad you love the trails as much as we do!

  • Thanks for proposing to re-route the Mt Carbon trail, it is needed in this area to reduce erosion and maintenance efforts. The City needs to continue to maintain the other Bear Creek Lake Park trails similarly in the future. Also, thank you for the Rooney Valley Trail re-route on Green Mountain..it is much more sustainable and interesting for hiking and biking. I was fortunate to help work on the Rooney Valley Trail and it was a terrific collaborative effort with City staff and the public volunteers to improve this section of trail. I encourage the City to continue it's efforts in improving and adding to the Green Mountain and Bear Creek trail systems. These parks and trails are incredible assets for the City and it's residents.

    BK asked 6 months ago

    We agree! Thank you for taking the time to comment.

  • I am a regular user of Green Mountain and BCLP, and I am so grateful for the work that Lakewood and volunteers do to help maintain and improve these trails. The Rooney Valley Trail reroute is now pretty fun, I enjoy it whether hiking or biking. I actually like climbing up Rooney trail more now than before. As for the dips, if they help sustainability/erosion then keep doing it. I know they potentially make the trail more fun for some mountain bikers, which the hikers could care less about, but I'd imagine they also limit the speed of the mountain bikers, so they should be better prepared to slow down for hikers, so I think they are a good thing for everyone. Anything that can be done to improve trails, make trails more sustainable, and add more miles of trail is fully supported by me. As we see these close to city front range trails constantly getting more trail users it is necessary to always be thinking about improvements and additions. Thank you so much for all your work, Lakewood and Volunteers.

    getsome asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments!

  • I've been on the Rooney Trail. You noted that Mt. Carbon Trail will be out sloped. The Rooney Trail has a lot of new in sloping, which is not ideal during heavy rain or snow melt. The dips seem to be made for biking, and not for sustainability (drainage). Dips are also not conducive to equestrian use, which seems to be lost in the conversation. Multi use should be made for multi use. Sorry to see the bike dips proposed on the Mt. Carbon Trail.

    Hiker Dude asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback! All new trail design features have been included to create a welcoming trail experience for all user groups with the intent to minimize erosion and create a more sustainable trail system. The Rooney Valley Trail was unique due to the grades, soils and vegetation on Green Mountain. While staff is utilizing similar techniques used at Rooney Valley, the rolling grade dips at Bear Creek Lake Park will be spaced further apart and will be lower in height as the overall grade of the cross slope is much less. It is our practice to provide a “natural” feel where possible while also preventing water erosion and minimizing on-going maintenance.

    With that being said, we appreciate your feedback and are currently reviewing our trail standards and best practices to determine next steps including future master planning efforts.

  • I am a frequent user of the Green Mountain and BCLP trail systems. I have lived just off of GM next to the High School for the last 15 years and hope to for the next 15. I am an active bike rider and runner as is my wife and both of my children. We love the trail improvements that have been made to GM lately. The lower Box of Rock's improvements made the trail much more desirable. The improvements to the Rooney Valley trail are a huge improvement to where the trail was. Yes, you have to ride a little slower in places but that has made the up hill riding and running experience better for all trail users with very little negative offset. I was on this trail twice in the last week as both a runner and a rider and each time thought about how much better the trail flows. it is a lot of fun to ride at night... I look forward to the future MT Carbon trail re route. Anything that will prevent erosion, create a more interesting user experience and reduce biker, hiker, horse negative interactions with reduced speeds is a positive in my book. I helped to build the Rooney Valley trail improvements. I felt that working on the park was a simple way to give back to something I love and use often. Fortunately, my work offers me some volunteer hours to dedicate towards good causes. I choose in 2018 to build trails and I will again in 2019 use my hours to continue to help to improve the trails I love around Lakewood and Jefferson county. -Charles Wright

    Charles W. asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback, Charles! We appreciate your volunteer support of our trails. Every volunteer has an immense impact. Thank you!

  • I have been mountain biking green mountain since the early 90’s. At that time it was nothing more than on single track on the east side and a some faint 4x4 trails that where mostly unrideable. Since then volunteer groups like COMBA have taking the trail system to a entire new level. I have ridden trails all over the US and Canada and the recent improvements, including the Rooney Valley trail, has Green Mountain at the top of my list for places to ride. Of course some may not like certain types of trails however the flow of the COMBA trails in Green Mountain and neighboring parks has something for everyone. Let’s keep up the improvements. Thanks!

    TM asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your good experiences on these trails! The City is committed to ensuring the trails are enjoyed by all.

  • I was involved in the Rooney Valley reroute work, which was coordinated with COMBA. First, as much in life, compromises must be made with trail design. Using the latest design methods, which you do, is a must. Then, following that, the trail layout/location/details will tend to "satisfy" different users differently. I generalize that bikers prefer to make turns, and hikers would rather go a little straighter; in some way, the "journey" vs the "destination" comparison. I believe that a 5% grade really is a good target; not too steep to climb for bikers/hikers. Not too steep where bikers get too much speed coming down or have to ride brakes a lot. Hikers knees/quads are not so stressed. (Equestrians are much less sensitive, due to being "powered".) SO, I feel both the Rooney Valley reroute and the new Mt Carbon work satisfy the needs of the most users. While I personally wouldn't have used so many DEEP dips/grade reversals on Rooney Valley, they are certainly fun on a downhill mtn bike. I believe they ARE harder to climb for both bikers and hikers. I can understand a hiker being critical of those. Bottom line for me: continuing trail work on both Green Mountain and BCLP are sorely needed. I personally believe that improving both would create an incredible "destination" experience right in town. Green Mountain provides enough elevation to create huge potential recreational use. And BCLP provides the users with an easier experience. I look forward to an even bigger commitment by Lakewood to enhance these gems.

    Greg asked 6 months ago

    The City is committed to our trails and working on next steps based on all of the great feedback we have received! Thank you for taking the time to share your experience.

  • I appreciate all efforts of the city, community and trail builders to improve our local trail systems. I was proud to lend a few hours of elbow grease to help build the Rooney Trail reroute and felt it was my duty as a Green Mountain resident who uses local trails many times a week. As an avid mountain biker, I now find the trail to be much more enjoyable to ride in both directions, but particularly uphill, since the reroute actually allows for acceleration, flow and a few respites from climbing. I encourage all trail users to offer a few hours of volunteer time to trail building. It allows you to appreciate first hand not only the labor-intensive nature of the work, but also the limitations and thoughtful decisions that go into the creation of each switchback and trail feature.

    mountaingirlinthecity asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for taking the time to volunteer with us!

  • It's always great to see trail improvements that were made with cooperation from the community. I think the new Rooney Trail Improvements are much more sustainable then the previous trail. Will some users always prefer to go straight up and down a mountain? Sure. But that's never going to be sustainable at a trail system this close to a major metropolitan area. I personally enjoy hiking up the gentle grade as the dips help the trail dry out much faster. If Bear Creek is having similar issues and needs rework, this seems like a great way to improve sustainability and the user experience. There will always be more aggressive trails for deeper into the mountains. Those get used less and don't need to be built as flat.

    chris asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback!

  • As a frequent user of the Bear Creek mtb trails I can't wait for the new reroute. I totally agree that the west side of Mt Carbon is in dire need of something similar to that done on the Rooney Valley trail. The current erosion problem will only continue to get worse without the reroute. I look forward to lending a hand (and a shovel) once the work commences. Put me on your list!

    pbr asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments, we will take all the help we can get! Find volunteer opportunities here including National Trails Day on June 1!

  • Thank you for allowing public comment on this. As a resident of Green Mountain and an active member of both the trail building community as well as the mountain bike and hiking communities, I have a few thoughts to share. The reroute on the Rooney system on Green Mountain has been a much needed improvement. The trail itself is more sustainable and slows down downhill bike traffic. The previous trail was shorter, more dangerous to hikers and bikers, and had significant erosion issues along with trail widening. I do agree that the Rooney reroute may be viewed as more desirable to bikers. This is really not the case. Speaking as a biker I now prefer to descend Box o Rox rather than Rooney. Rooney is now better suited for uphill bike traffic as Box O Rox is more suited to downhill traffic. Without direction restricted trails, the best option is to optimize the direction of bike traffic by terrain and trail building. The additional rolling dips on Rooney are great for controlling the flow of water and the speed of traffic so I encourage the hiking community to embrace them. Not sure I follow the argument that rolling dips are harsher on a hiker's joints. I would argue hiking in general is harsher than walking on flat ground. As a mountain biker and hiker I constantly see the voices of the biking community being silenced by the hiking community. When I've shown up for many volunteer trail building and maintenance days, the majority of people working on trail improvement and reroutes come from the biking community. I would encourage the hiking community to join in as many hands make light work and your input is welcome. Lastly, the majority of our trail damage occurs due to unsustainable trails that have high use during muddy days. Hikers and bikers are guilty of using our trails when we should not. Research has shown hiking use on muddy trails has the same impact as biking but hikers appear in much larger numbers on the front range. Jeffco open space pegs their hiker to biker ratio around 8 to 1. One study below is a good example. We have to balance the needs and desires of different groups access and use of public lands. Public input is a great place to start. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21856066

    RMB asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments! We agree, balance is key. We wish for all user groups to enjoy our great trail system and will continue to engage our residents to help us strike the right balance.

  • This reroute looks like a solid plan to improve the longevity and quality of a high-use multi-use trail. While I wish to acknowledge the well-informed feedback from pedestrian trail users, especially regarding the similarities between this reroute and the Rooney Valley Trail, I do not agree with the comparisons made. The contour lines of Green Mountain make water mitigation difficult and force a lot of tightly packed features close together to prevent erosion on different aspects. The proposed redirect is a much more consistent grade and consistently SSW facing, so seasonal snow buildup should be minimal. As for doubts about water mitigation vs mountain bike playground, years of trail work have taught me that rolling dips are one of the best ways to mitigate erosion and move water off the trail. Water bars, steps, and rock gardens are functional, but less durable and can be overwhelmed in a large storm cycle. Rolling dips can be designed to slow mountain bike traffic or even discourage it, but this project is being partially funded by a MTB advocacy group (COMBA) which will certainly have mountain bikers in mind with their trail design. As long as the redesign does not adversely affect mtb/pedestrian interactions (encourage excess speed, blind crests, blind corners), I can get behind any trail work that improves the durability and quality of the trail for all users.

    Ben S. asked 6 months ago

    Great comments and observations regarding water mitigation!

    The Rooney Valley Trail was unique due to the grades, soils and vegetation on Green Mountain. While staff is utilizing similar techniques used at Rooney Valley, the rolling grade dips at Bear Creek Lake Park will be spaced further apart and will be lower in height as the overall grade of the cross slope is much less. It is our practice to provide a “natural” feel where possible while also preventing water erosion and minimizing on-going maintenance.

    Thanks for taking the time to provide feedback.


  • I found this link from a post on NextDoor by Barb Franks. If I read between the lines, there is concern at the higher levels of Lakewood government about some of the past and potential future trail work to be done. As a reference, I live in Lakewood next to Green Mountain. I enjoy those trails nearly every day and I frequently talk to other trail users about their experience and issues at the park. The vast majority of these people (hikers, runners, bikers) have good things to say about recent improvements. Especially in light of the fact that little to nothing was done prior to about a year ago at Green Mountain (Hayden). We must continue to improve these Lakewood gems AND add trail miles wherever possible. There has been a noticeable uptick in trail use, especially on the Rooney Valley trail, since the work was completed. We need a master plan (I am assuming we don’t have one) for Green Mountain and Bear Creek Lake to help manage trail popularity. When it comes to new trail techniques (rolling dips and such), they clearly are working. Look at the new work done at the top of the Green Mountain trail before the communications tower. This used to be a drainage nightmare and was unusable frequently. Since the dips have been added, we had one of the snowiest winters I have seen in a while, and the trail performed great (despite heavy usage when people should have probably stayed off it). I am not sure why these rolling dips and meandering loops are considered negative experiences by some. I like the new flow, dips, and meandering hiking up Rooney. Also, if I want a flatter, straight shot up the mountain, I head up the fire road or Green Mountain trail. Options are good. I also take issue when people espouse about trail design yet don’t seem to be actively involved in creating solutions. I volunteered for the Rooney trail build crew and saw first-hand the attention to detail, planning, and assimilation of different trail uses brought to bear on the work. There was constant balance between user experience and resource protection. I applaud Lakewood for taking the initiative to improve Green Mountain and now Bear Creek Lake. I implore Barb Franks and the Lakewood team to execute on the Bear Creek project and to continue with the team that you have in place. My understanding is that it is mostly all volunteer and it costs the Lakewood taxpayers little to nothing. I fear that any changes in direction may result in higher costs and less trail improvement or new trail planning. For others that have differing ideas on trail design, please bring these ideas and join the effort to design and build these trails by volunteering! You will find these folks open to ideas and extremely passionate about improving our trail systems.

    JCLakewood asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback! We also greatly appreciate the support of volunteers who love our trails as much as we do! We hope to continue to provide many trail options for our residents and visitors in the future and are working hard at balancing the needs and desires of all user groups. I agree with your idea of master planning both sites, a plan would be extremely beneficial and is on our radar.

  • I am a frequent hiker and biker in Bear Creek Lake Park and! a Jefferson County resident. I fully support this trail improvement as it will enhance the trail for all users. This plan has been very well thought out and planned and will serve us well for years to come!

    asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback, we love trails!

  • I think a perfect example of how wonderful a trail re-routing system can make for a better mountain bike experience is at Green Mountain the Rooney Valley Trail. I with open arms invite trail rebuilding at Bear Creek. Not only does it make for a better experience but controls erosion and allows for better multi use.

    Grn mtn mole asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback!

  • I have been riding, hiking, and taking video and photos on the trails at Green Mountain and Bear Creek Lake Park since I moved to the GM area in 2001. I love the new trails on GM (Box o' Rox and Rooney Valley as well as improvements on the north side a few years back). My daughters have grown up on these trails and they too, love the new trails. I have read others concerns about these new GM trails and understand these concerns. GM and BCLP seem to be getting more users all the time. I think it would be great to have hiking only and biking only trails where possible. I don't like encountering some cyclists when hiking and while I don't mind yielding to hikers while biking, there are more and more people which greatly disrupts the flow of a ride. For Mt. Carbon, I would encourage you to explore 2 new trails that address sustainability and environmental concerns - one for mountain bikers, one for hikers and equestrians. I know the budget is limited but I think an alternate route for hikers would be nice on GM for the new Rooney Valley trail. I'd also like to see more trails on GM that are managed that discourage the social trails (where I see people all too frequently). I would love to see more trails, hiking only, biking only and multi-use at BCLP and GM. My whole family loves the new trails! Thank you to all who worked on these and all trails!! And to those that are working on new trails!

    riverboogieman asked 6 months ago

    Great feedback, staff is always seeking opportunities for new trails and are currently exploring alternatives to mitigate user conflicts!

  • I’m a mountain biker and hiker, and I volunteered to help build the Rooney Valley changes on GM. I think the new trail is as good as it can be and similar work should absolutely be done at Bear Creek! While there are complaints about the increased distance, it means trail users get to spend more time outside in this beautiful state! Plus, the switchbacks don’t necessarily increase the thrill for mountain bikers. It makes descending slower, but the increased quality of the trail is absolutely worth it and the improved visibility makes passing safer for hikers and equestrians too. The rolling dips aren’t just for bikers, also. Preventing water damage helps all users. As a hiker, I’ve definitely almost twisted my ankle several times because of erosion damage. To the city of Lakewood, thank you for trying to improve the trails. It definitely isn’t easy to balance everybody’s concerns, so thanks for designing awesome trails and taking public input.

    Teegan asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback! We appreciate it!

  • The “rolling dips” sound like they will make the trail more desirable to bikers and create a sub-par experiments for hikers, runners, and walkers. This sounds similar to the change that was made to the Rooney valley trail on Green Mountain, which ruined a great trail for those on foot.

    AGC asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback! The Rooney Valley Trail was unique due to the grades, soils and vegetation on Green Mountain. While staff is utilizing similar techniques used at Rooney Valley, the rolling grade dips at Bear Creek Lake Park will be spaced further apart and will be lower in height as the overall grade of the cross slope is much less. We heard the concerns voiced regarding the Rooney Valley Trail and have made it our practice to provide a “natural” feel where possible while also preventing water erosion and minimizing on-going maintenance. It’s a balancing act!

    Please let us know if you have additional questions or concerns.


  • First, thank you to the city of Lakewood for opening up these projects to public comment prior to implementation. In the recent past the public was not prior informed or allowed to comment. This plan looks like a toned-down version of the reroute of the Rooney Valley Trail at William F Hayden Green Mountain Park. The reroute of the Rooney Valley trail, with the "rolling dips" and addition of turns seemed to improve the experience for mountain bike riders at the expense of pedestrian and equestrian traffic. This reroute took a roughly one mile section of trail and stretched it to nearly 1.6 miles, with turns that almost double-back on themselves and at one point, actually goes backward against the grade. Additionally, the "rolling dips" are so tightly-spaced that it causes uphill pedestrian traffic to constantly crest little hills only to drop a couple of feet and have to re-climb the same elevation over and over. To a downhill pedestrian, the dips are punishing to hips and knees as the length of an adult's stride causes the leading foot to land awkwardly against a slightly uphill slope. I was told by a parks official that the large number of turns were put in place to reduce the grade to make ascending easier and improve visibility to reduce danger from descending cyclists. I find that ascending is actually more difficult as a pedestrian because of the dips, causing the same elevation to be climbed multiple times and that the many turns make descending more dangerous because mountain bikers have less distance available between turns to pass a pedestrian. I have found that while ascending and descending cyclists are more apt to engage in riskier passing techniques to avoid being slowed down. I do agree that erosion prevention is imperative to good trail maintenance, but I do not believe that the high frequency of dips and turns are necessarily a good balance between erosion mitigation and user experience. I find it highly unlikely that these dips and turns that lead to a more exhilarating mountain bike ride just so happen to be the best practice for erosion prevention. I have looked at the USFS guidelines for trail building (which was coauthored by the International Mountain Bike Association) and it states that "rolling grade dips" should be spaced so that the climb is 3 to 5 meters before it returns to a downslope. It also states that the dips are useless at the top of a grade. Whereas, on the Rooney Valley trail these dips and turns are constant and unrelenting. It appears that a better solution for our parks would be the technique called "knicks." It also calls out trails with out-of-rhythm sections as "trail disasters" -"Building out-of-rhythm sections (abrupt turns). Why did this happen? The trail's rhythm and flow weren't checked before cutting it in." It also says that high-use trails should be built between 5 and 10% grade. The Rooney Valley reroute is at the very bottom of this range. I request that the city gain more input from different types of park users prior to implementing changes such as these and work to find a compromise to maximize a balance of good maintenance practices and the experience of all trail users.

    keeplakewoodactive asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments, they are important to us! I want to assure you that the trail reroute proposed at Bear Creek Lake Park is following best practices based on trail maintenance needs while taking into consideration soils, grade, drainage issues and public usage. Within these standards we must recognize each trail is unique, our intention on this project and future trail projects is to increase the average grade where possible within the 5-10 percent best practice range to achieve the desired trail route while minimizing turns or corners. The terrain on this particular trail will be closer to 5 – 6 percent grade for much of the trail due to the natural terrain the trail crosses. We agree that a slightly higher average grade should be considered on future projects where feasible. We are planning for 3 - 5 meters between grade dips whenever possible; however, terrain and drainage needs may require these grade dips to be closer in a few locations.

    The Rooney Valley Trail was also unique due to the grades, soils and vegetation on Green Mountain. While staff is utilizing similar techniques used at Rooney Valley, the rolling grade dips at Bear Creek Lake Park will be spaced further apart and will be lower in height as the overall grade of the cross slope is much less. It is our practice to provide a “natural” feel where possible while also preventing water erosion and minimizing on-going maintenance. It’s a balancing act!

    I hope this additional information eases your concerns, we will continue to request feedback on proposed trail projects and do our best to balance all user groups. Please let us know if you have further questions.

  • This trail reroute is very much needed. Thanks!

    Rogerfromco asked 6 months ago

    We are so glad you agree!

  • Do what you guys believe is best for the park - I love the new trails at green mountain and bear creek so far - keep building new ones on green mountain!

    Shane asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments! We love these trails as well!