The story of Lakewood’s official song, tree and flower

about 2 months ago
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As we celebrate 50 years of Lakewood, we can’t help but reflect on our city’s past anniversary celebrations, and the last one for Lakewood’s 40th anniversary was celebrated by picking Lakewood’s official song, tree and flower.

The city launched a contest asking those who lived, worked, attended school or owned a business in Lakewood to submit nominations for an official song, tree and flower for the city. Song nominations had to create original music and lyrics, and flowers and trees had to be sustainable in our climate, drought tolerant, and be readily available for purchase. A jury of a City Council member, residents and city staff chose the winning nominations.

The city’s elevation put the winning song on top while plants native to the West and already thriving in locations throughout Lakewood won as official tree and flower..

Official song

The city’s official song is “Lakewood, More Than a Mile High,” an original composition with lyrics. Tim Hoffman wrote and composed the song, which the judges noted is a catchy, toe-tapping tune with an easy-to-follow melody. It is a song that could be taught to elementary students, and it was professionally done. Download the sheet music at Lakewood.org/50, and make sure to use #Lakewood50 when performing it for your friends so we can share it.

Official tree

The city’s official tree is Celtis occidentalis, known both as the common hackberry and the Western hackberry. The jury noted that the hackberry is a hardwood, does well in drought and grows slowly, allowing it to better handle snow loads. It also is low maintenance, native to parts of the West, leafs out late in the spring helping it withstand spring snowstorms, and is a four-season tree providing a lacy, intricate visual even during the winter.

Official flower

The city’s official flower is Salvia pachyphylla, known as Mojave sage. The jury selected this nomination because it is native to the West, has two-color blooms, requires no watering or fertilizing once established, is long-lived and a humming bird magnet.

The contest created a unique way to celebrate Lakewood’s 40th anniversary, and the official selections give residents items they can call Lakewood’s to this day.